The Committee on World Food Security:
A Visual Introduction

> The Committee on World Food Security (CFS) has become one of the central platforms for food policy and global food governance. As with many UN bodies, its structure and workings are full of acronyms and hazy relationship. We have attempted to capture the broad relationships between each of its parts, and their relevance.

The Convention on Biological Diversity:
A Visual Introduction

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> The Convention on Biological Diversity is another part of the UN framework that we engage with. In an effort to facilitate young people (and all people) interested in biodiversity to engage with the CBD, we’ve created this map. Its structure may seem hazy and confusing, but it just takes getting used to. 

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The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change:
A Visual Introduction

> The Climate Convention has grown into a many ringed circus over the years and as such can be unnavigable to everyone but seasoned veterans. Despite being the most prominent multilateral environmental agreement, the interplay between the many features of the UNFCCC's structure is not well understood. We hope that this map gives at least a cursory overview from which to dive into the depths!

The International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture:
A Visual Introduction

> The International Treaty for Plant Generic Resources for Food and Agriculture, or ITPGRFA, came into force on June 24th, 2004. It addresses a concern to preserve and sustainably use plant genetic resources that are not covered under the Convention on Biological Diversity, and that are under the threats of erosion and enclosure.

Earth in Brackets + the United Nations
A Visual Introduction

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> The United Nations is a complicated institution, here’s our introduction to its structure. Keep your short-term memory sharp, since the UN speaks the language of acronyms, and you’ll likely come across many that you had never seen, but hopefully some of these will be familiar to you. 

1. The United Nations General Assembly contains all the members states of the UN, and they have equal representation. Currently there are 193 members, whereas there were originally 51. Resolutions are discussed and voted on, although these are only binding to states if they are budgetary. These are also observer states (currently, the Holy See and Palestine) which are able to participate but not vote.

2. Established by the UN Charter in 1945, the Trusteeship Council is the only primary organ of the UN no longer operating. Its purpose was to supervise and assist in the administration of "Trust Territories." These consisted of Nations and territories taken from defeated nations following WWII

3. Subsidiaries of the general assembly: report to the General Assembly and/or ECOSOC. The decisions they take do not become effective until they have been adopted by the General Assembly. They are established by the General Assembly. They are mostly financed through voluntary contributions as well as UN budget funds for staff posts.

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